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Vitamin D Details

There has been a recent surge in the interest in Vitamin D, both in its health benefits and how to safely obtain it. There is no denying that Vitamin D is necessary for a healthy diet, as it helps to maintain strong bones and teeth and may help in preventing certain cancers, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. It is a common misconception, though, that unprotected exposure to UV rays is the best and only source for Vitamin D. There are much safer and equally effective ways of getting the daily required amount of Vitamin D, without putting yourself at risk for skin cancer.

SSA supports the American Academy of Dermatologists recommendation that individuals should obtain Vitamin D from foods already rich in Vitamin D (most fishes, eggs), foods fortified with Vitamin D (milk, some cereals and breads, yogurt) or from Vitamin D supplements.

 

To make sure you are getting the correct daily amount of Vitamin D, please refer to the chart below:

Age Children Men Women Pregnancy Lactation
Birth to 13 years 5 mcg
(200 IU)
       
14-18 years   5 mcg
(200 IU)
5 mcg
(200 IU)
5 mcg
(200 IU)
5 mcg
(200 IU)
19-50 years   5 mcg
(200 IU)
5 mcg
(200 IU)
5 mcg
(200 IU)
5 mcg
(200 IU)
51-70 years   10 mcg
(400 IU)
10 mcg
(400 IU)
   
71+ years   15 mcg
(600 IU)
15 mcg
(600 IU)
   

mcg= Micrograms, IU= International Units. For a full explanation of these measurements, visit http://www.biometics.com/article.asp?id=272

Note: Those most at risk for Vitamin D deficiency include those individuals with a darker skin tone, older adults, breastfed infants and those who are obese. Make sure to get your daily amount of Vitamin D the sun safe way.

References:

http://www.aad.org/Forms/Policies/Uploads/PS/PS-Vitamin%20D.pdf

Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes: Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Vitamin D, and Fluoride. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1997.

http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/vitamind.asp

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